Category: Scripture


Letter to the Hebrews

“It is not clear who the writer of Hebrews might have been.  Whoever it was, the letter reveals that the author is personally acquainted with those to whom he is writing and is familiar with the persecution which they are enduring.

Obviously having that suffering in mind, and with an awareness that many of the Jewish Christians are being urged to return to Judaism, the writer sets forth a tremendous defense of the Christian faith, drawing forcefully from a Jewish context in urging continued faith in Jesus as the Christ.  Moving logically and systematically from one argument to another, the writer shows the superiority of Christ over all that is held to be important to the Jewish religion — prophets, angels, Moses, Joshua, the Levitical priesthood, the covenant, and the sacrifices.”

Read:  Hebrews 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, & 6:1-12

All quotations taken from The Daily Bible.

Second Letter by Peter

“Peter’s second letter is similar in content both to Jude’s letter, which warned against false teachers, and to Paul’s discussion of the second coming in his two letters to the Thessalonians.

Peter begins his letter by stressing the importance of true spiritual knowledge.  he warns his readers to beware of those who might pervert the gospel of Christ by teaching a counterfeit doctrine.  Peter concludes by clarifying once again that, although Christ has not reappeared as quickly as some have expected, both his coming and the judgment of man are as certain as God’s Word itself.  The strong implication is that some of his readers ought to be thankful that the Lord has not yet come again, because if he had, they would not have been ready!”

Read:  2 Peter 1, 2 & 3

All quotations taken from The Daily Bible.

First Letter by Peter

“Without doubt this is a time of hostility, if not actual physical persecution, against all Christians.  Therefore, the subject of Peter’s first letter is suffering, and the thrust of the letter is an exhortation to steadfastness.  Peter begins by recounting for his readers the blessings which they have in their redemption, and then encourages them in the fact that in Christ they are God’s special people.  But Peter also reminds them that, as God’s redeemed ones, they have a responsibility to glorify God in their lives.  He concludes by noting the blessings which come through persecution and by urging steadfastness through faith and godliness.”

Read:  1 Peter 1, 2, 3, 4 & 5

All quotations taken from The Daily Bible.

 

 

Letter by James

“In his Galatian letter, Paul refers to James as ‘the Lord’s brother,’ and he indicates that he is a leader in the Jerusalem church.  So it would not be surprising that James, ‘the Lord’s brother,’ would be the author of one of the inspired letters of the New Testament.

Unlike Paul, James does not struggle with deep issues of doctrine or comment upon any specific problems which a particular local church might be facing.  Rather, he addresses himself to the crisis of persecution facing all the churches during this time.

After discussing the nature of temptation, James writes at length concerning the need for consistency between faith and conduct.  In context, James appears to be saying that only those who demonstrate true faith can endure the sufferings of the times, and that faith can be measured by conduct.  Despite its immediate relevance to times of widespread persecution, James’ writing contains words of practical advice for every Christian’s daily walk.”

Read:  James 1, 2, 3, 4 & 5

Letter by Jude

“Little is known of Jude (Judas) or his work, although some believe he is mentioned on two occasions, not only as a brother of Jesus, but also as a church leader and prophet in Jerusalem.  In his letter, Jude is trying to combat a widely believed philosophy which denies that the sins of the flesh can affect the soul — a philosophy which, naturally enough, has led to flagrant immorality.  In order to stress the potentially dangerous consequences of such teaching, Jude uses both Old Testament and extrabiblical writings (the book of Enoch) to remind his readers of God’s judgment upon the ungodly.”

Read:  Jude

All quotations taken from The Daily Bible.

Second Letter to Timothy

“It appears that Paul may have been rearrested in either Nicopolis or Troas and returned to Rome under a sentence of death.  The tone of Paul’s last known letter indicates that Paul knows his time is short and Paul wants Timothy to come to him as soon as possible.  Paul warns Timothy about the coming of opposition and encourages him to be strong in defense of the faith.  There is a sense of urgency in his exhortations, as if Timothy is Paul’s last link with future generations of those to whom the gospel will be entrusted.”

Read:  2 Timothy 1, 2, 3 & 4

All quotations taken from The Daily Bible.

Letter to Titus

“Paul is about to leave for Nicopolis in Greece, where he has decided to spend the winter and where he expects Titus, whom he had earlier left in Crete.  Titus is apparently facing some of the same challenges as Timothy in his efforts to preserve doctrinal purity and to establish effective local congregations.  Therefore, Paul’s letter to Titus bears a resemblance to his letter to Timothy in its emphasis on false teaching, church organization, and instruction in Christian living.”

Read:  Titus 1, 2 & 3

All quotations taken from The Daily Bible.

First Letter to Timothy

“Paul writes to Timothy, who as a young evangelist is facing serious challenges to faith and doctrine within the church at Ephesus.  Paul therefore deals with matters of church organization and conduct, particularly regarding prayer; the role of women; qualifications of elders and deacons; support of widows; and proper attitudes for Christian slaves.  The entire letter reflects the tone of a father writing to his son, as indeed Paul apparently regards this young man, Timothy.”

Read:  1 Timothy 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 & 6

All quotations taken from The Daily Bible.

Letter to the Philippians

“While still imprisoned, Paul also reaches out to the Christians in Philippi, with whom he has maintained close ties since his three visits to their city.

In this letter Paul is writing to a small-town congregation in which two women, Euodia and Syntyche, have had a falling out.  As is so often the case when personality conflicts develop, their personal animosity is splitting the whole church.  Therefore Paul pleads with the two women — and indeed all Christians — to learn to love each other more.

Paul bases his appeal on the bedrock example of Christ’s own humility in putting others’ interests first, even at great personal cost.  The apostle urges them to sacrifice their selfish feelings and to commit themselves to working out their problems, particularly in light of the fact that their pagan neighbors are watching their behavior.”

Read:  Philippians 1, 2, 3 & 4

All quotations taken from The Daily Bible.

Letter to the Ephesians

“Paul writes about the exalted relationship between Christ and the church and the practical results which that knowledge ought to bring into the lives of individual Christians.  He begins by summarizing how God’s eternal plan is revealed through Christ, then proceeds to teach various lessons regarding the church, personal righteousness, earthly relationships, and the Christian’s relationship with God.”

Read:  Ephesians 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 & 6

All quotations taken from The Daily Bible.

Letter to the Colossians

“During these two years of house arrest, Paul writes four letters which have come to be known as the Prison Epistles.  Although Paul has never visited Colossae, one of his companions, Epaphras, had evidently informed Paul of the pagan secularism which threatens the churches in that region.

In paganism, virtue is not associated with religion.  Religious practice is for the purpose of warding off demons and evil ancestors — not for the purpose of becoming a better person.  To Paul, the Christian life is more than simply giving up bad habits.  It is acquiring a newness of mind which comes from setting your heart and mind on Christ Jesus.  Only a person with the mind of Christ can truly overcome the sins of the flesh and live according to the Spirit.”

Read:  Colossians 1, 2, 3 & 4

Letter to Philemon

“Before coming to Rome and being converted by Paul, Onesimus had been a slave of a Christian named Philemon.  Onesimus  had run away from Philemon and had evidently taken some money or property belonging to his master.  Paul now writes to Philemon on behalf of Onesimus and asks that Philemon accept Onesimus back as a brother in Christ.  The letter is an insightful study in personal relationships among Christians and contrasts the freedoms that come when one is under bondage to Christ.”

Read:  Philemon

All quotations taken from The Daily Bible.
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