Abraham Marries Keturah

“All of Abraham’s sons other than Isaac are eventually sent away, presumably to insure preeminence to Isaac and his descendants.”

Read Genesis 25:1-6

Death of Abraham

“The Genesis record closes its account of Abraham’s life with a brief account of his death and burial.  Significantly, Ishmael and Isaac bury not only their father, but also (at least temporarily) any hostility which may have come between them over the years.”

Read Genesis 25:7-10

Last Account of Ishmael

“Because the Genesis record will soon concentrate exclusively on the life of Isaac and his descendants, a last account of Ishmael and his sons is given at this point.”

Read Genesis 25:12-18

Esau and Jacob

“The remainder of the Genesis record provides an in-depth look at Isaac’s children and grandchildren.  The people whose lives are recorded exhibit both the best and worst of human nature, typifying the moral struggles which encompass the human predicament and pointing up the need for a God who can lift mankind above its own circumstances.

The scene for the next 150 years is set when Rebekah gives birth to twins and is told prophetically that these two sons will be the fathers of nations which will in time struggle with each other for dominance.”

Read Genesis 25:11, 25:19-26

“As Esau and Jacob grow into manhood, they take on individual characteristics and become especially favored: Esau, by Isaac; Jacob, by Rebekah.”

Read Genesis 25:27-28

Birthright Is Sold

“An incident having extraordinary consequences is now recorded which not only gives insight into the character of each man, but also has important implications for the further descent of the people through whom God has chosen to reveal himself.”

Read Genesis 25:29-34

“Careless, and apparently disinterested in the benefits and responsibilities attendant to the birthright, Esau unknowingly forfeits his opportunity to be the one in his generation through whom the blessings promised to his grandfather Abraham would pass.  In fact, pursuant to the prophecy given to Rebekah, in future years Esau’s descendants will indeed be subservient to the Hebrews, who will be the direct descendants of Jacob.”

Isaac Follows in Abraham’s Footsteps

As his two sons engage in fraternal conflict, Isaac himself experiences moral conflict in a series of situations which are amazingly parallel to situations experienced by his father, Abraham.  First Isaac encounters a famine and is forced to migrate to Gerar, where he lies about Rebekah exactly as Abraham lied about Sarah, and finally has similar disputes over the same wells previously dug by his father.”

Read Genesis 26:1-33

All quotations taken from The Daily Bible
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